Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Don’t Assume a False Alarm!

Has your household got a common understanding of what should actually happen when the alarm goes off?  This morning we had another false alarm, and yes most times they are!  Being a house where we have a few people at home most of the time, I considered this morning’s casual response as the alarm was switched off and how everyone just carried on about their business. Sooner or later we could pay a high price for that casual response of annoyance and irritation.

Do you have an agreed ALARM PROCEDURE that everyone in your household follows?  Well I decided we need one and I am sharing ours.  I have stuck it next to the alarm panel.

The alarm must automatically be treated as a SERIOUS MATTER and the following rules are to be followed:

1)  Do not go outside to investigate alone!

2) Lock all doors and close all windows immediately!  First close the doors and then close then windows INCLUDING the bathroom window and kitchen windows (ALL windows).

3)  If I am not at home you need to observe from inside of the house and consider some good vantage spots where you can look out.

4)  Do NOT turn off the alarm too soon and only turn off the alarm after doors and windows have been closed – the alarm will encourage an intruder to go not hand around but if you turn it off too soon it encourages them to stay!  Reset the alarm immediately.

5)  Only reopen doors and windows when it is obvious all is ok.  If I am not at home then observe for at least 30 minutes before opening up windows and doors.

6)  If anyone is observed then phone the emergency number 10111 and speak clearly telling them we have an intruder and the address – speak clearly and slowly.

7)  Move out of less secure rooms (like a sunroom) into more secure rooms!  It is generally considered best that the intruder sees people are at home and be seen speaking on the phone so he knows he has been seen and is being reported.  Even if you have finished speaking keep “talking” on the phone so he thinks you are giving information!  This will increase the chance of the intruder LEAVING.

8)  It is probably better to open gates from inside the house (if you have remotes) so the intruder can get away and help can get inside.

9) Make sure everyone knows where torches and other security devices are kept IN ONE ACCESSIBLE PLACE.

Keep emergency numbers somewhere they are not moved! On the fridge or next to the phone and include other numbers you can also call such as neighbours!

Personalise these notes for your property and family and share extra comments and advice.

Be prepared and stay safe.

This original article is shared with you by Andre de Villiers –  Chas Everitt Cape Town South

The most expensive streets, suburbs and estates in Cape Town

The most expensive streets, suburbs and estates in Cape Town

Amid the tumultuous environment of the property market over the last several years in South Africa, Cape Town has not only remained stable in house price inflation but shown significant growth thanks to foreign investors and migration from other provinces.

Data a research group, Lightstone, recently analysed data of several million properties in the Western Cape and pinned the annual inflation rate at just under 4.0%, with a monthly rate of 0.27%.

One of the most interesting findings, the group said, is how the value and volume of properties compares between Cape Town and Johannesburg.

During 2008 the rand experienced its most dismal period to date performing exceptionally low against its global counterparts and the property market experienced negative growth on a national scale.

“Annual property inflation experienced similar growth nationally over the next four years. After 2012 however, the Western Cape and the City of Cape Town became increasingly more attractive to potential buyers,” Lightstone said.

Looking at the most expensive suburbs in Cape Town, Bishopscourt is the most expensive with an average value of R17.1 million, followed by Llandudno, Constantia Heights, Clifton, Steenberg and De Bosch in Stellenbosch.

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“With most property prices on the rise, first time buyers are looking at more affordable options in lower cost suburbs like Pelikan Park, Kayelitsha and Parklands,” Lightstone said.

Even though the forecast for the Cape Town property market remains stable for 2018, this could be subject to changes dependant on government’s planned land expropriation without compensation strategy, the group said.

“In the interim, the appetite for foreign investments in the Cape Town property market will provide the required strength within the industry; and the demand for secure estate living will continue where both freehold and sectional title should enjoy much needed growth.”

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

IN AND AROUND THE CAPE PENINSULA THE CITY’S MOST EXPENSIVE MARKETS CONTINUED TO SHOW THE CLEAREST SIGNS OF SLOWING PRICE GROWTH IN THE 1ST QUARTER.  Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its price growth slow the fastest off the highest base, while in certain more affordable sub-regions of the City there has still been some growth acceleration.

In the 1st quarter of 2018, we saw further slowing in house price growth in the City Bowl and the other major 3 sub-regions closest to the City Bowl, i.e. in and around the Cape Peninsula.

These sub-regions near to the city and the mountain have shown some of the strongest house price inflation of all of the Cape Town sub-regions over the past 5 years, and this prior deterioration in home affordability appears to have led to slowing demand, and thus price growth, in recent quarters.

The most expensive sub-region in the City of Cape Town Metro, i.e. the Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its average house price growth slow the most sharply off the highest base, from a revised multi-year high of 27.5% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2016 to 2.3% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

This does not surprise us, as this sub-region has experienced the most rapid cumulative growth of all the sub-regions over the past 5 years, to the tune of 111%.

The City Bowl started its price growth slowdown a little earlier than the Atlantic Seaboard, and has gone from its revised multi-year year-on-year growth high of 23.6% in the 2nd quarter of 2016 to 10.0% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

The Southern Suburbs, the other one of the “most expensive 3” sub-regions, saw further slowdown from 10.1% in the prior quarter to 8.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, having gradually slowed from a multi-year high of 16.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2015.

Arguably reflective of the heightened search for relative affordability in or near to Cape Town’s prime place of employment, the City Bowl, is the indication that the most affordable sub-region within close proximity to the City Bowl, i.e. the Near Eastern Suburbs sub-region (including amongst others Salt River, Woodstock and Pinelands), shows the fastest house price growth of these “Major 4” sub-regions in or near to the Cape Peninsula.

Proximity to the City Bowl (and for that matter to Claremont Business Node) is becoming increasingly important as the city’s traffic congestion deteriorates. From a 19.4% high in the 1st quarter of 2016, the Near Eastern Suburbs House Price Index has also seen year-on-year growth slowing, but less significantly than the others, to reach 13.4% by the 1st quarter of 2018. It now has the fastest price growth rate of the Major 4 sub-regions surrounding Table Mountain.

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THE TREND OF SLOWING GROWTH IS LESS PRONOUNCED IN THE MORE AFFORDABLE SUBURBAN MARKETS, AND SOME SUB-REGIONS EVEN SHOW STRENGTHENING PRICE GROWTH.

Further away from Table Mountain, in Cape Town’s more affordable suburban areas, the pattern of “slowdown” in price growth remains less clear, and there has even been some acceleration in certain sub-regions. We remain of the belief that the extremely high prices in the areas close to the City Bowl may have been encouraging a portion of aspirant buyers to shift their home search to these more “affordable” City of Cape Town housing markets a little further away, in search of greater affordability.

All 3 major Northern Suburbs sub-saw double-digit average house price growth rates in the 1st quarter of 2018, with 1 out of the 3 showing a growth acceleration.

The Western Seaboard Sub-Region (including Blouberg, Milnerton and Melkbosstrand) saw a slowing in year-on-year price growth, from 14.7% in the previous quarter to 14.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, the 2nd successive quarter of slowing growth.

The “Bellville-Parow and Surroundings” sub-region also saw its price growth slow, from 11.4% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.8% in the 1st quarter of 2018, after prior quarters of strengthening.

However, the Durbanville – Kraaifontein – Brackenfell sub-region continued to accelerate mildly, from 9.8% growth in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.1% in the 1st quarter of 2018.

Moving into even more affordable regions, ones which incorporate many of the city’s Apartheid Era former so-called “Coloured” and “Black” Areas, we have recently seen price growth accelerations.

This, too, we believe could reflect a mounting search for relative affordability after rapid price inflation in the higher priced “suburban” areas in recent years.

Therefore, we have seen the Cape Flats House Price Index experience a further growth acceleration, from 11.4% year-on-year in the previous quarter to 11.6% in the 1st quarter of 2018. The Elsies River-Blue Downs-Macassar Region has also seen house price growth accelerate further to reach 25% year-on-year, from 23.7% in the previous quarter.

CONCLUSION

In short, in the 1st quarter of 2018, the City of Cape Town has seen further mild slowing in average house price growth for the 7th consecutive quarter, although the most recent 10.0% year-on-year growth rate remains strong.

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Source:  John Loos FNB Property Barometer

This has been distributed by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Whether you’re after a windswept coastal wander, a mountainous hike with spectacular views, or a leisurely amble through one of the Cape’s lush nature reserves, here’s our pick of the best hiking trails in and around the city. So, lace up your hiking boots and get cracking… And, let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Important note:
Although the Cape is rich in natural beauty, tourists and locals are urged to take necessary precautions when exploring secluded areas, as crimes and accidents do happen.
Those venturing into the Table Mountain National Park should have the following emergency numbers on hand: 086 110 6417/ 107 or 021 480 7700. Criminal incidents should be reported to the nearest police station as soon as able.
We also recommend @safetymountain as a useful resource for hikers. This free safety tracking service allows you to notify local trackers of your contact details, intended route and travel time via whatsapp. You are then able to provide hourly updates on your progress, and to notify trackers when you are safely off the mountain.

It helps to have a map, and for that, SANParks and The Inside Guide recommends Slingsby Maps as an essential resource for hiking enthusiasts. Detailed maps of some of the Cape’s best hiking trails are available, including the Pipe Track, Cape Point and the Cederberg. Contact Slingsby Maps at 021 788 4545 for more information.

Hiking trails in Cape Town
Hiking trails around the Cape

Source:  https://insideguide.co.za/cape-town/hiking-trails/

This post brought to you by Chas Everitt Cape Town South