#CapeTownBaboons – Let’s Stand Together

#CapeTownBaboons – Let’s Stand Together

We will all be peacefully gathering along Spaanschemat River Road from Constantia Village Mall.

Saturday 14th July 10-12 Noon

Our aim is to show the authorities who sit on the Baboon Technical Team (being the City of Cape Town, Cape Nature and Sanparks) that we, the residents of Cape Town do NOT want our baboons killed.

Beauty Without Cruelty SA have arranged this gathering and have some posters, but please also bring your own posters and banners as well and come and stand shoulder to shoulder for our baboons.

* We have limited time to get the word out – Please share this *

#Glencairn Suburb Reports

#Glencairn Suburb Reports

#Glencairn – Suburb Property Report – We can’t send you the latest gossip, but we do have all the property information for Glencairn!

For any property owner, this is really interesting and important information.

Our Suburb Report is unique, and this is the first time it has been offered. It has taken substantial research to put these reports together, but this will show you exactly what has ACTUALLY happened with property in Glencairn both historically and recently.

Click link below for the Suburb Property Report request

http://eneighbourhoods.co.za/area…/glencairn/suburb-reports/

Cape Town dams: Joy as water levels jump up by another 6%

Cape Town dams: Joy as water levels jump up by another 6%

What an unbelievable month for the Cape Town dams. Four weeks ago, the facilities were at less than 20% full. But now, they’re pushing the 40% mark.

More news on dam levels here

“The dams feeding the City of Cape Town are now better off at 37.8%.”

The Voëlvlei dam (currently 31.4% full this week), the Theewaterskloof dam (26.6% full this week) and the Bergriver Dam (61.7% full this week) are all showing improvements in excess of 5%.”

“With Bergriver dam having increased by nearly 10% in the past seven days. Up the West Coast the Clanwilliam dam has jumped from 20.4% a week ago to 36%. A few weeks ago the dam was below 6%.”

Winter is here! Great restaurant deals!

Winter is here! Great restaurant deals!

We all know that along with this chilly out of season weather (and very welcome rain) the poor restaurants really can suffer, so here’s a list from Eat Out of Cape Town restaurants that are offering to tempt us into their warm cozy restaurants with some super specials!  Click here 

Foxcroft

 

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

IN AND AROUND THE CAPE PENINSULA THE CITY’S MOST EXPENSIVE MARKETS CONTINUED TO SHOW THE CLEAREST SIGNS OF SLOWING PRICE GROWTH IN THE 1ST QUARTER.  Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its price growth slow the fastest off the highest base, while in certain more affordable sub-regions of the City there has still been some growth acceleration.

In the 1st quarter of 2018, we saw further slowing in house price growth in the City Bowl and the other major 3 sub-regions closest to the City Bowl, i.e. in and around the Cape Peninsula.

These sub-regions near to the city and the mountain have shown some of the strongest house price inflation of all of the Cape Town sub-regions over the past 5 years, and this prior deterioration in home affordability appears to have led to slowing demand, and thus price growth, in recent quarters.

The most expensive sub-region in the City of Cape Town Metro, i.e. the Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its average house price growth slow the most sharply off the highest base, from a revised multi-year high of 27.5% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2016 to 2.3% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

This does not surprise us, as this sub-region has experienced the most rapid cumulative growth of all the sub-regions over the past 5 years, to the tune of 111%.

The City Bowl started its price growth slowdown a little earlier than the Atlantic Seaboard, and has gone from its revised multi-year year-on-year growth high of 23.6% in the 2nd quarter of 2016 to 10.0% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

The Southern Suburbs, the other one of the “most expensive 3” sub-regions, saw further slowdown from 10.1% in the prior quarter to 8.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, having gradually slowed from a multi-year high of 16.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2015.

Arguably reflective of the heightened search for relative affordability in or near to Cape Town’s prime place of employment, the City Bowl, is the indication that the most affordable sub-region within close proximity to the City Bowl, i.e. the Near Eastern Suburbs sub-region (including amongst others Salt River, Woodstock and Pinelands), shows the fastest house price growth of these “Major 4” sub-regions in or near to the Cape Peninsula.

Proximity to the City Bowl (and for that matter to Claremont Business Node) is becoming increasingly important as the city’s traffic congestion deteriorates. From a 19.4% high in the 1st quarter of 2016, the Near Eastern Suburbs House Price Index has also seen year-on-year growth slowing, but less significantly than the others, to reach 13.4% by the 1st quarter of 2018. It now has the fastest price growth rate of the Major 4 sub-regions surrounding Table Mountain.

Get a free property valuation report

THE TREND OF SLOWING GROWTH IS LESS PRONOUNCED IN THE MORE AFFORDABLE SUBURBAN MARKETS, AND SOME SUB-REGIONS EVEN SHOW STRENGTHENING PRICE GROWTH.

Further away from Table Mountain, in Cape Town’s more affordable suburban areas, the pattern of “slowdown” in price growth remains less clear, and there has even been some acceleration in certain sub-regions. We remain of the belief that the extremely high prices in the areas close to the City Bowl may have been encouraging a portion of aspirant buyers to shift their home search to these more “affordable” City of Cape Town housing markets a little further away, in search of greater affordability.

All 3 major Northern Suburbs sub-saw double-digit average house price growth rates in the 1st quarter of 2018, with 1 out of the 3 showing a growth acceleration.

The Western Seaboard Sub-Region (including Blouberg, Milnerton and Melkbosstrand) saw a slowing in year-on-year price growth, from 14.7% in the previous quarter to 14.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, the 2nd successive quarter of slowing growth.

The “Bellville-Parow and Surroundings” sub-region also saw its price growth slow, from 11.4% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.8% in the 1st quarter of 2018, after prior quarters of strengthening.

However, the Durbanville – Kraaifontein – Brackenfell sub-region continued to accelerate mildly, from 9.8% growth in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.1% in the 1st quarter of 2018.

Moving into even more affordable regions, ones which incorporate many of the city’s Apartheid Era former so-called “Coloured” and “Black” Areas, we have recently seen price growth accelerations.

This, too, we believe could reflect a mounting search for relative affordability after rapid price inflation in the higher priced “suburban” areas in recent years.

Therefore, we have seen the Cape Flats House Price Index experience a further growth acceleration, from 11.4% year-on-year in the previous quarter to 11.6% in the 1st quarter of 2018. The Elsies River-Blue Downs-Macassar Region has also seen house price growth accelerate further to reach 25% year-on-year, from 23.7% in the previous quarter.

CONCLUSION

In short, in the 1st quarter of 2018, the City of Cape Town has seen further mild slowing in average house price growth for the 7th consecutive quarter, although the most recent 10.0% year-on-year growth rate remains strong.

Get a free property valuation report

Source:  John Loos FNB Property Barometer

This has been distributed by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations
South Africa’s new plug and socket standard, SANS 164-2 or ZA Plug, has become mandatory for new installations, the SABS confirmed to MyBroadband.

This means that any new buildings erected must incorporate electrical sockets that conform to the new standard.

An amendment to the wiring code introduced in 2016 stated that the ZA Plug would become semi-mandatory for new installations in March 2018.

Each new plug point must have at least one socket that can accommodate a ZA Plug, it said.

The amendment came into effect two months early, said the SABS, and from January 2018 all new installations must incorporate the ZA Plug.

The ZA Plug has the same hexagonal profile as the Europlug seen on cell phone chargers but includes an earth pin. It is substantially more compact than South Africa’s three-prong plug standard and has much thinner pins.

Adoption of the standard has been slow, however.

Gianfranco Campetti, the chairman of the working group that looks after the standard, said the industry has been slow to respond and use the standard in essential products.

He said the appliance industry, in particular, has been slow to provide goods with the new plug.

The switch

When the IEC first began development on IEC–906–1, which became IEC60906–1, it was trying to establish a universal plug and socket system.

Despite its efforts, commercial and political interests caused the standardisation initiative to fail in Europe – and Brazil and South Africa are the only countries to have adopted the 250V standard.

However, Brazil deviated from the standard by delivering either 127V or 220V mains using the same socket.

Japan and the US have plugs and sockets that are compatible with the IEC’s envisioned global standard for 125V sockets.

Talk of adopting the new standard began in South Africa in 1993, and a version of SANS 164–2 that dates back to 2006 is available online.

According to the SABS, the ZA Plug appeared in South Africa’s wiring code (SANS 10142–1) during 2012.

Old standard still legal

Although it is now required to integrate sockets which comply with the ZA Plug standard in new buildings, the old standard remains legal.

The wiring code amendment also does not affect existing buildings, including homes.

It is therefore not currently necessary for South Africans to switch the electrical sockets in their homes.

Article source

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Bramble is an online platform aimed at connecting students wanting to sell or buy textbooks, as well as physical and electronic notes. This not only allows students to earn an extra income, but it also makes the learning process a whole lot easier.

As students ourselves, we understand the real life of a student and we hope to give you more room for the good life, more time for studying and, most importantly, more money at the end of the month.

The Bramble platform has one major beneficiary,

– the students.

We hope that the creation of a platform that allows students to set their own prices will allow shopping for textbooks to be more affordable and less stressful.


This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt International 

Hotel Hysterical

Hotel Hysterical

Hotel Hysterical is back with Rob Van Vuuren, Martin Evans & Lindy Johnson. Its bound to be another hysterical evening so book now!

Hotel Hysterical is a collaboration between Hotel Glencairn and locally based comedian Rob Van Vuuren, bringing local and international comedic talent for audiences in the deep south. Rob Van Vuuren hand picks the comedians and Hotel Glencairn offers them a historical and comfortable venue. Don’t delay book now to secure your tickets for this Fridays show.

Time: 20h30

Date: 9 March 2018

Venue: Hotel Glencairn, 10-12 Glen Road, Glencairn.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Glencairn, the early years

Glencairn, the early years

Glencairn and the Else (also referred to as Els) river valley are located on the coast of False Bay, between Fish Hoek and Simon’s Town.

In 1743 the Dutch East India Company established an official station and anchorage at Simonstown. An early map, drawn in 1870, shows the course of the river which was originally known as the “Elze Rivier” (Burman 1962). Throughout the early days of the Cape settlement, Else Bay (Glencairn beach) was mainly known as the last hazard on the difficult road to Simon’s Town, and other than a few fisherman who trekked from the beach, it was little disturbed – Tredgold (1985)

In 1811 the farm Elsje’s River was granted to Christoffel Brand, its main product being vegetables. Another farm called Elsje’s Baai was operated as a tannery. There is no mention at this time of the earlier farm Hartenbosch which was located in the area now known as Da Gama. Further up the valley was the farm Brooklands, which was where the water treatment facilities are now located. – Tredgold (1985)

Welcome Farm incorporated the Welcome Glen suburb and Naval Sports Fields. At Welcome Farm there was a mill to which farmers brought their corn to be ground. The farms raised cattle and grew vegetables – Tredgold (1985)

First resident, John Brown and his family settled in Elsje’s Bay in about 1875 – Tredgold (1985)

In the 1890s Stegman built his beach house on the Glencairn Heights side of the valley – Tredgold (1985)

The Glencairn residents built a tennis court in 1922 – Tredgold (1985)

In the 1920s the tidal pool was built – Tredgold (1985)

Glen Farm bought between the wars by W G Haines – Tredgold (1985)

Glen Cottage, 36 Glen Rd was used as Rest & Recreation by the military during the Boer War

56 plots sold on 23rd November 1901

The foundation stone of the church was laid in 1903, the hotel opened in 1904.

It is not known for certain how the former name of Glencairn, Else Bay, or the name of the Else River originated. Various theories are reviewed by Clifford (2003), favourite being that Rooi Els trees (Cunonia capensis) formerly grew along the river. However, none have been encountered during this study, and attempts by the local community to re-establish these trees in the vlei and lower river areas have largely proven unsuccessful. The second refers to a ship, the Esselstein, which stopped over in Simon’s Bay in 1671. Thereafter Simon’s Bay was referred to as Esselstein Bay, and the Else River as Esselstein River.

Cobern (1984) describes how a probable error in the transcription of maps could have led to the word ‘Elsestein’, the shortened version of which is ‘Else’. He further suggests that the careless translation of ‘Else Rivere’ from Dutch to French and finally to English, ‘Else’s River’, could have led to the further error, perpetuated to this day, of referring to Elsies River and Elsies Peak. Else Bay was later renamed Glencairn by its early Scottish residents, after the Glencairn area in the North of Scotland – (Clifford 2003).

The quarry was opened in 1898 (possibly earlier) adjacent to Main Road and the railway line. The quarry was operated by the Divisional Council and possibly closed between 1914 and 1918. Thereafter Strong and Moore re-equipped the workings and were still operating the quarry when it was closed in May 1978 due to environmental concerns, and appreciation of the tourist potential of the area.

The Cape Glass Company exploited the light grey sands found along the bottom of Glencairn Valley between 1902 and 1906. The industrial remains of the factory now form part of the Simon’s Town Museum’s collection.

The Cape Glass Company bought the railway siding built for the Salt River Cement Company and a narrow gauge cocopan that extended up the valley. The limited literature available on the company suggests that they were mining sand, but Clifford (2003) suggests that they were removing limestone. No evidence of its original presence remains.

Glencairn’s quicksands no longer exist and were stabilized by a change in the river’s discharge conditions caused by the construction of the railway embankment in 1890.

Glen Farm, dating from the 1800s stood where the warden’s house now stands. The de Villiers family lived in Welcome Farm and Glencairn Cottage, the de Villiers cemetery lies behind Glencairn Cottage.

Original farms were: Glen Farm, Welcome Glen, Oaklands and Brooklands

“Welcome Cottage Farm” by Lt Cdr (Mrs) D Visser. (undated) Simonstown Museum Files

Old flour mill with fine stonework and bricks dating from Batavian times1803-1806

Welcome Glen farm Deed of Grant completed in 1811, Welcome Cottage built between 1812 and 1815. it came into the possession of the de Villiers Family in 1871, remaining in the family for over a century. Over the years they produced vegetables, flowers, bark for tanning purposes and latterly, dairy produce. The land was sold to the Navy in 1970, except for 6 morgen on which the cottages stand. They were subsequently expropriated in 1974. Welcome Cottage no. 440 has been slightly altered by the addition of an enclosed stoep and a new roof, but otherwise remains unaltered with yellow wood beams, door and flooring, 5 triangular gables surmounted by pedimental caps.

Brown’s Cottage ca. 1890 possibly 124 Glen Rd.

Stegman’s cottages built in the 1892 by a farmer from Durbanville, who built a beach house at what is now 24 Fairburn Road

Bulletin Volume XIX No.2 Snippets from Old Simon’s Town July 1996

In 1928 there was a private Native Location near the old Glass Works. It consisted of 25 dwellings and a school (pg 37 Glencairn Mission School?). The Health inspector recommended it be closed and it was cleared in 1931.

The squatter-like shack community in what is now Glencairn Heights was associated with the Strong & Moore Quarry. The community was relocated under the Group Areas Act. A Wesslyan Mission School existed there years before, followed by a mission school and church.

From: Roger Jaques’ thesis

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Hotel Glencairn Community Market – Valentines edition

Hotel Glencairn Community Market – Valentines edition

Its Market day time again, we cant wait to see you all down at the Hotel.

We have music as usual, great stalls, yummy food, jumping castles and an awesome vibe just for you. bring the kids, bring the folks it’s a great day out with the family.

This ongoing market showcases a fabulous bunch of creatives, music, crafts, food and an all round vibe. Take some time out this Sunday and come mingle with your neighborhood.

Date: 4 Febuary 2018

Time: 10:00–16:00

Place: Hotel Glencairn, 10-12 Glen Road, Glencairn

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South